Releasing our next episode on Spotify today at 6pm. . Listen to Episode 6 "Eru Munneru" using the link in our bio. . . Key Highlights: 1. Mission Hope - UAE's highly ambitious Mars Mission. 2. Should people wear both masks and helmets while riding? 3. Tamil Nadu localities get a phonetic makeover with changes in English spellings. 4. Are the lockdown extension claims fake? How do we treat these fake Whatsapp messages? . . #hopemarsmission #UAE #spaceprobe #uaemarsmission #globalspaceexploration #emiratesmarsmission #Mars #covid19 #coronavirus #pandemic #masks #coronaprotection #tn_police #tamilnadu #masksandhelmets #namechange #tnnamechange #koyampuththoor #nomorecbe #tamizhnadu #fakemessages #whatsappforwards #socialmedia #nangooram #nangoorampodcasts #podcastersofinstagram #podcastsofinstagram #tamilpodcast #googlepodcasts #anchorpodcast
In a flying first, @nasa flew a small helicopter - named Ingenuity - on Mars. Ingenuity performed the first powered, controlled flight on another planet. 🚁 🔴 But #dyk that rotorcraft flight can be a great way to get around on other worlds? In fact, sometimes it's preferable! Saturn's moon Titan is an ocean world and the destination for Dragonfly, the rotorcraft lander being designed by Johns Hopkins APL. 🪐 But no two atmospheres are exactly alike! The Martian atmosphere and the aerodynamics of the Mars helicopter are very different from Titan and Dragonfly. Titan's dense atmosphere (4x Earth's) and low gravity (1/7th Earth's) mean it’s physically easier to fly on Titan than on Earth (or Mars!). Yet flying is still one of the best ways to get around. Why? It's all about the physics (and the view). Operators for the Mars rovers have to find a safe driving path for the vehicle. This means never driving farther than the rovers’ cameras can see - usually no more than 100m per drive (about the length of an American football field), sometimes much less. Flying, on the other hand, only requires that areas be safe enough for the vehicle to land and take off again. On Titan, Dragonfly will scout out its own safe and scientifically interesting landing sites. Using rotors instead of wheels, Dragonfly can also cover greater distances and visit different terrain types. Titan has an atmosphere that makes it possible for a vehicle with aerial capability – like Dragonfly - to fly. Titan’s thick atmosphere and low gravity allow Dragonfly to carry its science payload to Titan’s diverse environments, including an impact crater where liquid water and complex organic materials (key ingredients for life) once existed together, possibly for tens of thousands of years. Congratulations to the @NASAJPL team for a successful test flight of the Ingenuity Mars helicopter! 🎉 #JHUAPL @nasasolarsystem #solarsystem #Mars #Ingenuity #marshelicopter Reposted from @johnshopkinsapl
In a flying first, @nasa flew a small helicopter - named Ingenuity - on Mars. Ingenuity performed the first powered, controlled flight on another planet. 🚁 🔴 But #dyk that rotorcraft flight can be a great way to get around on other worlds? In fact, sometimes it's preferable! Saturn's moon Titan is an ocean world and the destination for Dragonfly, the rotorcraft lander being designed by Johns Hopkins APL. 🪐 But no two atmospheres are exactly alike! The Martian atmosphere and the aerodynamics of the Mars helicopter are very different from Titan and Dragonfly. Titan's dense atmosphere (4x Earth's) and low gravity (1/7th Earth's) mean it’s physically easier to fly on Titan than on Earth (or Mars!). Yet flying is still one of the best ways to get around. Why? It's all about the physics (and the view). Operators for the Mars rovers have to find a safe driving path for the vehicle. This means never driving farther than the rovers’ cameras can see - usually no more than 100m per drive (about the length of an American football field), sometimes much less. Flying, on the other hand, only requires that areas be safe enough for the vehicle to land and take off again. On Titan, Dragonfly will scout out its own safe and scientifically interesting landing sites. Using rotors instead of wheels, Dragonfly can also cover greater distances and visit different terrain types. Titan has an atmosphere that makes it possible for a vehicle with aerial capability – like Dragonfly - to fly. Titan’s thick atmosphere and low gravity allow Dragonfly to carry its science payload to Titan’s diverse environments, including an impact crater where liquid water and complex organic materials (key ingredients for life) once existed together, possibly for tens of thousands of years. Congratulations to the @NASAJPL team for a successful test flight of the Ingenuity Mars helicopter! 🎉 #JHUAPL @nasasolarsystem #solarsystem #Mars #Ingenuity #marshelicopter Reposted from @johnshopkinsapl
In a flying first, @nasa flew a small helicopter - named Ingenuity - on Mars. Ingenuity performed the first powered, controlled flight on another planet. 🚁 🔴 But #dyk that rotorcraft flight can be a great way to get around on other worlds? In fact, sometimes it's preferable! Saturn's moon Titan is an ocean world and the destination for Dragonfly, the rotorcraft lander being designed by Johns Hopkins APL. 🪐 But no two atmospheres are exactly alike! The Martian atmosphere and the aerodynamics of the Mars helicopter are very different from Titan and Dragonfly. Titan's dense atmosphere (4x Earth's) and low gravity (1/7th Earth's) mean it’s physically easier to fly on Titan than on Earth (or Mars!). Yet flying is still one of the best ways to get around. Why? It's all about the physics (and the view). Operators for the Mars rovers have to find a safe driving path for the vehicle. This means never driving farther than the rovers’ cameras can see - usually no more than 100m per drive (about the length of an American football field), sometimes much less. Flying, on the other hand, only requires that areas be safe enough for the vehicle to land and take off again. On Titan, Dragonfly will scout out its own safe and scientifically interesting landing sites. Using rotors instead of wheels, Dragonfly can also cover greater distances and visit different terrain types. Titan has an atmosphere that makes it possible for a vehicle with aerial capability – like Dragonfly - to fly. Titan’s thick atmosphere and low gravity allow Dragonfly to carry its science payload to Titan’s diverse environments, including an impact crater where liquid water and complex organic materials (key ingredients for life) once existed together, possibly for tens of thousands of years. Congratulations to the @NASAJPL team for a successful test flight of the Ingenuity Mars helicopter! 🎉 #JHUAPL @nasasolarsystem #solarsystem #Mars #Ingenuity #marshelicopter
In a flying first, @nasa flew a small helicopter - named Ingenuity - on Mars. Ingenuity performed the first powered, controlled flight on another planet. 🚁 🔴 But #dyk that rotorcraft flight can be a great way to get around on other worlds? In fact, sometimes it's preferable! Saturn's moon Titan is an ocean world and the destination for Dragonfly, the rotorcraft lander being designed by Johns Hopkins APL. 🪐 But no two atmospheres are exactly alike! The Martian atmosphere and the aerodynamics of the Mars helicopter are very different from Titan and Dragonfly. Titan's dense atmosphere (4x Earth's) and low gravity (1/7th Earth's) mean it’s physically easier to fly on Titan than on Earth (or Mars!). Yet flying is still one of the best ways to get around. Why? It's all about the physics (and the view). Operators for the Mars rovers have to find a safe driving path for the vehicle. This means never driving farther than the rovers’ cameras can see - usually no more than 100m per drive (about the length of an American football field), sometimes much less. Flying, on the other hand, only requires that areas be safe enough for the vehicle to land and take off again. On Titan, Dragonfly will scout out its own safe and scientifically interesting landing sites. Using rotors instead of wheels, Dragonfly can also cover greater distances and visit different terrain types. Titan has an atmosphere that makes it possible for a vehicle with aerial capability – like Dragonfly - to fly. Titan’s thick atmosphere and low gravity allow Dragonfly to carry its science payload to Titan’s diverse environments, including an impact crater where liquid water and complex organic materials (key ingredients for life) once existed together, possibly for tens of thousands of years. Congratulations to the @NASAJPL team for a successful test flight of the Ingenuity Mars helicopter! 🎉 #JHUAPL @nasasolarsystem #solarsystem #Mars #Ingenuity #marshelicopter Reposted from @johnshopkinsapl
In a flying first, @nasa flew a small helicopter - named Ingenuity - on Mars. Ingenuity performed the first powered, controlled flight on another planet. 🚁 🔴 But #dyk that rotorcraft flight can be a great way to get around on other worlds? In fact, sometimes it's preferable! Saturn's moon Titan is an ocean world and the destination for Dragonfly, the rotorcraft lander being designed by Johns Hopkins APL. 🪐 But no two atmospheres are exactly alike! The Martian atmosphere and the aerodynamics of the Mars helicopter are very different from Titan and Dragonfly. Titan's dense atmosphere (4x Earth's) and low gravity (1/7th Earth's) mean it’s physically easier to fly on Titan than on Earth (or Mars!). Yet flying is still one of the best ways to get around. Why? It's all about the physics (and the view). Operators for the Mars rovers have to find a safe driving path for the vehicle. This means never driving farther than the rovers’ cameras can see - usually no more than 100m per drive (about the length of an American football field), sometimes much less. Flying, on the other hand, only requires that areas be safe enough for the vehicle to land and take off again. On Titan, Dragonfly will scout out its own safe and scientifically interesting landing sites. Using rotors instead of wheels, Dragonfly can also cover greater distances and visit different terrain types. Titan has an atmosphere that makes it possible for a vehicle with aerial capability – like Dragonfly - to fly. Titan’s thick atmosphere and low gravity allow Dragonfly to carry its science payload to Titan’s diverse environments, including an impact crater where liquid water and complex organic materials (key ingredients for life) once existed together, possibly for tens of thousands of years. Congratulations to the @NASAJPL team for a successful test flight of the Ingenuity Mars helicopter! 🎉 #JHUAPL @nasasolarsystem #solarsystem #Mars #Ingenuity #marshelicopter Reposted from @johnshopkinsapl
In a flying first, @nasa flew a small helicopter - named Ingenuity - on Mars. Ingenuity performed the first powered, controlled flight on another planet. 🚁 🔴 But #dyk that rotorcraft flight can be a great way to get around on other worlds? In fact, sometimes it's preferable! Saturn's moon Titan is an ocean world and the destination for Dragonfly, the rotorcraft lander being designed by Johns Hopkins APL. 🪐 But no two atmospheres are exactly alike! The Martian atmosphere and the aerodynamics of the Mars helicopter are very different from Titan and Dragonfly. Titan's dense atmosphere (4x Earth's) and low gravity (1/7th Earth's) mean it’s physically easier to fly on Titan than on Earth (or Mars!). Yet flying is still one of the best ways to get around. Why? It's all about the physics (and the view). Operators for the Mars rovers have to find a safe driving path for the vehicle. This means never driving farther than the rovers’ cameras can see - usually no more than 100m per drive (about the length of an American football field), sometimes much less. Flying, on the other hand, only requires that areas be safe enough for the vehicle to land and take off again. On Titan, Dragonfly will scout out its own safe and scientifically interesting landing sites. Using rotors instead of wheels, Dragonfly can also cover greater distances and visit different terrain types. Titan has an atmosphere that makes it possible for a vehicle with aerial capability – like Dragonfly - to fly. Titan’s thick atmosphere and low gravity allow Dragonfly to carry its science payload to Titan’s diverse environments, including an impact crater where liquid water and complex organic materials (key ingredients for life) once existed together, possibly for tens of thousands of years. Congratulations to the @NASAJPL team for a successful test flight of the Ingenuity Mars helicopter! 🎉 #JHUAPL @nasasolarsystem #solarsystem #Mars #Ingenuity #marshelicopter Reposted from @johnshopkinsapl
In a flying first, @nasa flew a small helicopter - named Ingenuity - on Mars. Ingenuity performed the first powered, controlled flight on another planet. 🚁 🔴 But #dyk that rotorcraft flight can be a great way to get around on other worlds? In fact, sometimes it's preferable! Saturn's moon Titan is an ocean world and the destination for Dragonfly, the rotorcraft lander being designed by Johns Hopkins APL. 🪐 But no two atmospheres are exactly alike! The Martian atmosphere and the aerodynamics of the Mars helicopter are very different from Titan and Dragonfly. Titan's dense atmosphere (4x Earth's) and low gravity (1/7th Earth's) mean it’s physically easier to fly on Titan than on Earth (or Mars!). Yet flying is still one of the best ways to get around. Why? It's all about the physics (and the view). Operators for the Mars rovers have to find a safe driving path for the vehicle. This means never driving farther than the rovers’ cameras can see - usually no more than 100m per drive (about the length of an American football field), sometimes much less. Flying, on the other hand, only requires that areas be safe enough for the vehicle to land and take off again. On Titan, Dragonfly will scout out its own safe and scientifically interesting landing sites. Using rotors instead of wheels, Dragonfly can also cover greater distances and visit different terrain types. Titan has an atmosphere that makes it possible for a vehicle with aerial capability – like Dragonfly - to fly. Titan’s thick atmosphere and low gravity allow Dragonfly to carry its science payload to Titan’s diverse environments, including an impact crater where liquid water and complex organic materials (key ingredients for life) once existed together, possibly for tens of thousands of years. Congratulations to the @NASAJPL team for a successful test flight of the Ingenuity Mars helicopter! 🎉 #JHUAPL @nasasolarsystem #solarsystem #Mars #Ingenuity #marshelicopter Reposted from @johnshopkinsapl
🤍💙HAPPY INTERNATIONAL WOMAN’S DAY💙🤍 Startet dagen med å løpe en god time og setter stor pris på mine piggsko😂 Mye is på stien ennå men deilig å være ute i skogen med sol og fuglekvitter☀️ #happyinternationalwomensday #kvinnedagen #mothernature #march #mars #walkonice #sun #reflectiononice #glacier #holke #outdoortraining #outdoorrunning #brodder #icebug #piggsko #hybrid #goretex #løpeglede #mandagsmila #speilblankt #løpno #liveterbestute #okley #dare2be #bergans #choosetochallenge
In a flying first, @nasa flew a small helicopter - named Ingenuity - on Mars. Ingenuity performed the first powered, controlled flight on another planet. 🚁 🔴 But #dyk that rotorcraft flight can be a great way to get around on other worlds? In fact, sometimes it's preferable! Saturn's moon Titan is an ocean world and the destination for Dragonfly, the rotorcraft lander being designed by Johns Hopkins APL. 🪐 But no two atmospheres are exactly alike! The Martian atmosphere and the aerodynamics of the Mars helicopter are very different from Titan and Dragonfly. Titan's dense atmosphere (4x Earth's) and low gravity (1/7th Earth's) mean it’s physically easier to fly on Titan than on Earth (or Mars!). Yet flying is still one of the best ways to get around. Why? It's all about the physics (and the view). Operators for the Mars rovers have to find a safe driving path for the vehicle. This means never driving farther than the rovers’ cameras can see - usually no more than 100m per drive (about the length of an American football field), sometimes much less. Flying, on the other hand, only requires that areas be safe enough for the vehicle to land and take off again. On Titan, Dragonfly will scout out its own safe and scientifically interesting landing sites. Using rotors instead of wheels, Dragonfly can also cover greater distances and visit different terrain types. Titan has an atmosphere that makes it possible for a vehicle with aerial capability – like Dragonfly - to fly. Titan’s thick atmosphere and low gravity allow Dragonfly to carry its science payload to Titan’s diverse environments, including an impact crater where liquid water and complex organic materials (key ingredients for life) once existed together, possibly for tens of thousands of years. Congratulations to the @NASAJPL team for a successful test flight of the Ingenuity Mars helicopter! 🎉 #JHUAPL @nasasolarsystem #solarsystem #Mars #Ingenuity #marshelicopter Reposted from @johnshopkinsapl
In a flying first, @nasa flew a small helicopter - named Ingenuity - on Mars. Ingenuity performed the first powered, controlled flight on another planet. 🚁 🔴 But #dyk that rotorcraft flight can be a great way to get around on other worlds? In fact, sometimes it's preferable! Saturn's moon Titan is an ocean world and the destination for Dragonfly, the rotorcraft lander being designed by Johns Hopkins APL. 🪐 But no two atmospheres are exactly alike! The Martian atmosphere and the aerodynamics of the Mars helicopter are very different from Titan and Dragonfly. Titan's dense atmosphere (4x Earth's) and low gravity (1/7th Earth's) mean it’s physically easier to fly on Titan than on Earth (or Mars!). Yet flying is still one of the best ways to get around. Why? It's all about the physics (and the view). Operators for the Mars rovers have to find a safe driving path for the vehicle. This means never driving farther than the rovers’ cameras can see - usually no more than 100m per drive (about the length of an American football field), sometimes much less. Flying, on the other hand, only requires that areas be safe enough for the vehicle to land and take off again. On Titan, Dragonfly will scout out its own safe and scientifically interesting landing sites. Using rotors instead of wheels, Dragonfly can also cover greater distances and visit different terrain types. Titan has an atmosphere that makes it possible for a vehicle with aerial capability – like Dragonfly - to fly. Titan’s thick atmosphere and low gravity allow Dragonfly to carry its science payload to Titan’s diverse environments, including an impact crater where liquid water and complex organic materials (key ingredients for life) once existed together, possibly for tens of thousands of years. Congratulations to the @NASAJPL team for a successful test flight of the Ingenuity Mars helicopter! 🎉 #JHUAPL @nasasolarsystem #solarsystem #Mars #Ingenuity #marshelicopter Reposted from @johnshopkinsapl
Ikke galskap men glaskap som venninnen min sa 💙 #isbading #1grad #mars #sol #glaskap
Vanakkam makkale (Hello people). We have arrived again at the shores! This is the sixth episode of our weekly podcast by Nanda and Karthik, two professionals from two different fields coming together to showcase their little known humor and also to discuss on some very serious topics. This week's episode is all about things which we can hold on during these pandemic times which could also potentially lift our spirits. Segments 1. UAE's Mars Mission all set to launch in July 2020 - 01:04 2. Masks & Helmets - Both necessary for bike-riding during Corona? - 02:41 3. Koyampuththoor - What will be the new abbreviated term for CBE? - 03:58 4. How to deal with fake forward messages in Whatsapp? - 05:10 Listen us on Spotify | Google Podcasts | Anchor. Share with your beloved Tamil makkal. We will join you again next week. Write to us & Follow us on Instagram - https://instagram.com/nangooram_tamil?igshid+158119fn7tf61 Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/nangooram.tamil/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/Nangooram1?s=09 Email - mail.anchorpodcast@gmail.com #hopemarsmission #UAE #spaceprobe #uaemarsmission #globalspaceexploration #emiratesmarsmission #Mars #covid19 #coronavirus #pandemic #masks #coronaprotection #tn_police #tamilnadu #masksandhelmets #namechange #tnnamechange #koyampuththoor #nomorecbe #tamizhnadu #fakemessages #whatsappforwards #socialmedia #nangooram #nangoorampodcasts #podcastersofinstagram #podcastsofinstagram #tamilpodcast #googlepodcasts #anchorpodcast
In a flying first, @nasa flew a small helicopter - named Ingenuity - on Mars. Ingenuity performed the first powered, controlled flight on another planet. 🚁 🔴 But #dyk that rotorcraft flight can be a great way to get around on other worlds? In fact, sometimes it's preferable! Saturn's moon Titan is an ocean world and the destination for Dragonfly, the rotorcraft lander being designed by Johns Hopkins APL. 🪐 But no two atmospheres are exactly alike! The Martian atmosphere and the aerodynamics of the Mars helicopter are very different from Titan and Dragonfly. Titan's dense atmosphere (4x Earth's) and low gravity (1/7th Earth's) mean it’s physically easier to fly on Titan than on Earth (or Mars!). Yet flying is still one of the best ways to get around. Why? It's all about the physics (and the view). Operators for the Mars rovers have to find a safe driving path for the vehicle. This means never driving farther than the rovers’ cameras can see - usually no more than 100m per drive (about the length of an American football field), sometimes much less. Flying, on the other hand, only requires that areas be safe enough for the vehicle to land and take off again. On Titan, Dragonfly will scout out its own safe and scientifically interesting landing sites. Using rotors instead of wheels, Dragonfly can also cover greater distances and visit different terrain types. Titan has an atmosphere that makes it possible for a vehicle with aerial capability – like Dragonfly - to fly. Titan’s thick atmosphere and low gravity allow Dragonfly to carry its science payload to Titan’s diverse environments, including an impact crater where liquid water and complex organic materials (key ingredients for life) once existed together, possibly for tens of thousands of years. Congratulations to the @NASAJPL team for a successful test flight of the Ingenuity Mars helicopter! 🎉 #JHUAPL @nasasolarsystem #solarsystem #Mars #Ingenuity #marshelicopter Reposted from @johnshopkinsapl